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 No judgment, only accompaniment during a Reasonably priced journey to sustainable, individualized health improvement.

Reduce Calories in Your Hot Beverage or Treat

 What a lovely setting somewhere in the world! Whether it is High Tea or an afternoon stop, we invariably look for ways to minimize the added sugars and solid fats (those solid at room temperature and also highly caloric) in your daily "happy" treat regime. 

Maybe it's the weekend splurge and all is beautifully set.  Reducing the "urge" for a potently sugary or high fat snack IS AS EASY AS repeatedly offering a lower degree of the treat.  Here are a few tips:

Choose 1/2 portions  of your treat; alternate sips with water or steamed milk. 

Know calories      of your treat (or the carb and fat and protein equivalent portions it equals) AND ask your Barista for ways to lower the fat content. Many exist.

Pick your favorite spices and seasonings      then add these to foam on coffee, hot cocoa, 1% hot milk of any variety, tea,   or baked "goodie", to build extra zero-calorie taste to your drink or treat.  

Examples include: chocolate shavings, vanilla sugar, citrus zest, doubling the Chai flavoring using nutmeg or cardamom. 

Find more discussion in an affordable nutrition-counseling package from www.stepwisehealth.org

 

Do you have enough reason(s) to reduce portions and limit high-calorie foods?

 

 

 

 
  
  

    What a view here! The American Diabetes Association (2016) has a variety of resources that show how much exercise the typical person must expend

     to burn the following foods. Yes!  These are portion and typical favorites, not "bad" foods. Consider pizza with a hand-tossed crust and cheesecake with

     a plain graham crust.  Know this: everyone has calorie needs. We do not just eat to burn off our calories. However, looking at balance in our daily intakes, 

     there may be some eyes opened by the fact that "some can be more than our stomachs need to take on" during one sitting regularly. 

     Send me out an email if you have any specific questions; this is great information and no need for sarcasm!

 

Contact me about other foods you are interested in knowing about.
  
  
  
  
  

      Food                                                      Miles (vigorous steps)

 

     2 chocolate peanut butter cups              2.8 miles

     

     three-scoop sundae                                9.0 miles

 

     movie theater popcorn

     (medium, buttered)                                11 miles

 

     can of soda pop                                      1.7 miles

 

     1 glazed donut hole                                .5 miles

 

      There we go.  My hope is that we all consider - thoroughly enjoying - small amounts of what we consider "good stuff" and continue to build better habits with managing our overall health as it creeps along.   We all benefit from learning new things!      

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

 

Exercise and Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Arthritis and Aging Joints in General

​We want to live a healthier lifestyle; and the health professionals ask us to use lifestyle if we want to lower our medication use. True enough?

​Then we set a couple New Year's Resolutions and are sure we can fit in the gym three days a week.  Or at least we can stretch in the morning.

​How long does it take to realize that we are really stiff after 45 years or 50?  During different seasons of the year, we surely do not feel as young as we did when we agreed to exercise three days a week.

​Solutions anyone? 

One is to write a note to yourself or put your workout weights on the kitchen table or the bathroom mirror.  Set the timer and go!  The American Council on Exercise states that physical activity boosts endorphins, the feel good hormones, giving one a heightened sense of wellbeing. Think of yourself with the following adjectives: 

​Stronger - Better - Faster - More Stable - Powerful

​Another solution involves making the stiffness decrease with stretching and incorporating more anti-inflammatory foods into your diet. Below is a list of some you may like and some you might like to try. These have omega 3 fatty acids in them, known to decrease inflammatory factors produced by the body or antioxidants. The bright colors in plant-based foods come from pigments that are also beneficial to health. You have correctly heard the phrase "the brighter color, the better". 

Fish -- Walnuts -- Chia Seeds

​Tumeric -- Cinnamon -- Ginger -- Garlic

​Fruits and Vegetables 

 

​Once we start the joints moving, they often feel much better. Ice on the joint for several minutes can bring relief if they are stiff before exercise - or simply working the joints with movement lends the body a more comfortable day than without the stretching and movement before the less active day.  Renewed focus on anti-inflammatory foods can help one feel more ready to be active as well, fulfilling the desires we initially had when setting up lifestyle changes any time of year.  I encourage you to stick with it. You only got one body. The best health  you can get is part of your wealth.

​**Please comment by sending me an email or contact note about other subjects or tidbits you would find helpful. We may set an appointment to talk in more depth.**

 

Adequate Vitamin D and Pre-Diabetes/Seasonality Risk Reduction

 

Two-thirds of the United State's and Australia's population are obese. As we age, commonly we are unaware of the growing risk of pre-diabetes through multiple risk factors.  Sure, we all think that we can - and often are - eat healthily and heartily. To that end, remember that our body-mind connection wants us to be in balance. Let's look at one micronutrient - a vitamin - that can be taken to moderate the risk of diabetes. 

What are the risk factors? Rising BMI (weight-to-height ratio), blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose, and long-term blood glucose, measured as A1C.   A recent study done in Australia noted that the development of adult onset, or Type 2 Diabetes, has been shown to be linked to inadequate Vitamin D (25, hydroxycholecalciferol) (Poonam, et al, 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178825). 

What foods and fluids supply Vitamin D? First, it is important to identify good sources of this nutrient. Secondly, let's understand how it functions. Vitamin D is acquired through exposure to sunlight, supplements, and through dietary intake of oily fish (mackerel, sardines, salmon, tuna, caviar, and of course, cod liver oil) and fortified milk, dry breakfast cereals and infant formula.  Key Observation: Vitamin D is in many protein-rich foods.  When diabetes is a chronic disease, it is important to consume protein in all eating occasions: snacks and small meals. Why? Like fats, protein slows the absorption of the ubiquitous carbohydrate/sugars we consume.  Conclusion: practice including protein/Vitamin D sources in your eating occasions makes later working with diabetes easier! 

Interested in how this micronutrient works? Vitamin D must be converted to it's active form in the liver and kidney.  Active forms are referred to as Calcidiol and Calcitriol, as they regulate calcium absorption. These active forms of Vitamin D carefully maintain the levels of calcium and phosphorous in the blood for bone mineralization. It also assists in autoimmune health, neuromuscular functions (preventing tetany) and cell growth.    

How much we need each day ranges from 400 to 800 IUs (International Units) and is referred to as the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) intaken from foods.  Some patients may have their serum Vitamin D (25-(OH)D levels checked and then supplemented by their physician to treat seasonal depression, and other concerns listed above (https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional). One can by over-the-counter Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) for use up to 2000IU per day, if recommended by a physician in tandem with qualifying lab results.

Why take consume food sources or supplement Vitamin D3, which is what we get from sun exposure?  Most of us do not get this vitamin through our skin due to lack of exposure in nature. 

Besides increasing diabetes risk factors, there is "seasonality", or seasonal depression, which can lead to stress, altered sleep patterns, craving foods high in carbohydrates, and unplanned weight gain that is left unmonitored.  Do you experience any of these symptoms without a second thought? Many reasons for them, including genetics, are offered for the pre-diabetes present and growing in both the USA and Australia.  Have you begun to see the benefits of consuming this vitamin? 

Solutions? Adding two servings of fish each week, three servings of fortified milk or formula, are excellent sources of Vitamin D and protein. Protein also increases alertness and helps our minds focus and muscles grow.  What a great food list from which to choose! The other half of your plate would be fruits and vegetables and 1/4th the plate complex carbohydrates (e.g. potatoes, wild rice, whole grain bread, oatmeal). If recommended, you can also supplement as advised by a professional following your health.

Skills can be developed for choosing a balanced diet, choosing vigorous physical activity, stress awareness, and sleep pattern moderation. You can enjoy the change of seasons in any country with focus on the nutrients in your food and fluids! Consider the "D" Vitamin daily.

 

 

 

 

 

Now, why would I need guidance for improved health?

Whether you want to become more aware of what hinders your health goals, evaluate your diet for nutritional balance, or are challenged by constant weight management barriers, adults and their families are what we offer health management for:

Below is a list of suggested reasons to make an appointment with a Stepwise Health, Wellness Dietitian:

 

Not sure what healthy eating habits are

Exercise regime or Menu needs

Situational Stressors are barriers to  my health OR my family's health OR my significant other's health (short term or long term)

Strongly Disliked food groups

​Calorie Restriction​makes food and fluids unpleasant? 

​Strongly disliked health habits you may have been told are "essential" to your success?

​​Rigid structure that mentally grinds over time, but you have to get that done for weight loss?

​Swapping sleep for hours of exercise?

Post-surgery without follow-up nutrition or Dietitian visits (gall bladder removal, major heart surgery, back surgery, limb amputation)

 

 

​We have 21 years of family, long-term care and clinical experience, cooking classes, menu writing, and have published in Weight Matters magazine. 

​Contact: kthisriv@stepwisehealth.com or kthisriv@gmail.com

​Contact: Twitter @ktrivard

​Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, member since 1996

Comments about this five year business

 

 

Honest comments from previous customers:

 

"My sleep gets really screwed up and I need to control my weight." - Rita O.

 

"Since I really needed someone to listen and paraphrase what was going on after surgery, I found these telephone discussions really helpful."  - George V.

 

​"My knee surgery at 55 got me a new diet, vegan soup; what a nice way to recover in style with gourmet colors, recipes and delicious new tastes."  - Judy H.

 

 

 

Anti-inflammatory Foods

Reduce Calories in Your Hot Beverage or Treat

 What a lovely setting somewhere in the world! Whether it is High Tea or an afternoon stop, we invariably look for ways to minimize the added sugars and solid fats (those solid at room temperature and also highly caloric) in your daily "happy" treat regime. 

Maybe it's the weekend splurge and all is beautifully set.  Reducing the "urge" for a potently sugary or high fat snack IS AS EASY AS repeatedly offering a lower degree of the treat.  Here are a few tips:

Choose 1/2 portions  of your treat; alternate sips with water or steamed milk. 

Know calories      of your treat (or the carb and fat and protein equivalent portions it equals) AND ask your Barista for ways to lower the fat content. Many exist.

Pick your favorite spices and seasonings      then add these to foam on coffee, hot cocoa, 1% hot milk of any variety, tea,   or baked "goodie", to build extra zero-calorie taste to your drink or treat.  

Examples include: chocolate shavings, vanilla sugar, citrus zest, doubling the Chai flavoring using nutmeg or cardamom. 

Find more discussion in an affordable nutrition-counseling package from www.stepwisehealth.org

 

Do you have enough reason(s) to reduce portions and limit high-calorie foods?

 

 

 

 
  
  

    What a view here! The American Diabetes Association (2016) has a variety of resources that show how much exercise the typical person must expend

     to burn the following foods. Yes!  These are portion and typical favorites, not "bad" foods. Consider pizza with a hand-tossed crust and cheesecake with

     a plain graham crust.  Know this: everyone has calorie needs. We do not just eat to burn off our calories. However, looking at balance in our daily intakes, 

     there may be some eyes opened by the fact that "some can be more than our stomachs need to take on" during one sitting regularly. 

     Send me out an email if you have any specific questions; this is great information and no need for sarcasm!

 

Contact me about other foods you are interested in knowing about.
  
  
  
  
  

      Food                                                      Miles (vigorous steps)

 

     2 chocolate peanut butter cups              2.8 miles

     

     three-scoop sundae                                9.0 miles

 

     movie theater popcorn

     (medium, buttered)                                11 miles

 

     can of soda pop                                      1.7 miles

 

     1 glazed donut hole                                .5 miles

 

      There we go.  My hope is that we all consider - thoroughly enjoying - small amounts of what we consider "good stuff" and continue to build better habits with managing our overall health as it creeps along.   We all benefit from learning new things!      

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

 

Exercise and Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Arthritis and Aging Joints in General

​We want to live a healthier lifestyle; and the health professionals ask us to use lifestyle if we want to lower our medication use. True enough?

​Then we set a couple New Year's Resolutions and are sure we can fit in the gym three days a week.  Or at least we can stretch in the morning.

​How long does it take to realize that we are really stiff after 45 years or 50?  During different seasons of the year, we surely do not feel as young as we did when we agreed to exercise three days a week.

​Solutions anyone? 

One is to write a note to yourself or put your workout weights on the kitchen table or the bathroom mirror.  Set the timer and go!  The American Council on Exercise states that physical activity boosts endorphins, the feel good hormones, giving one a heightened sense of wellbeing. Think of yourself with the following adjectives: 

​Stronger - Better - Faster - More Stable - Powerful

​Another solution involves making the stiffness decrease with stretching and incorporating more anti-inflammatory foods into your diet. Below is a list of some you may like and some you might like to try. These have omega 3 fatty acids in them, known to decrease inflammatory factors produced by the body or antioxidants. The bright colors in plant-based foods come from pigments that are also beneficial to health. You have correctly heard the phrase "the brighter color, the better". 

Fish -- Walnuts -- Chia Seeds

​Tumeric -- Cinnamon -- Ginger -- Garlic

​Fruits and Vegetables 

 

​Once we start the joints moving, they often feel much better. Ice on the joint for several minutes can bring relief if they are stiff before exercise - or simply working the joints with movement lends the body a more comfortable day than without the stretching and movement before the less active day.  Renewed focus on anti-inflammatory foods can help one feel more ready to be active as well, fulfilling the desires we initially had when setting up lifestyle changes any time of year.  I encourage you to stick with it. You only got one body. The best health  you can get is part of your wealth.

​**Please comment by sending me an email or contact note about other subjects or tidbits you would find helpful. We may set an appointment to talk in more depth.**

 

Adequate Vitamin D and Pre-Diabetes/Seasonality Risk Reduction

 

Two-thirds of the United State's and Australia's population are obese. As we age, commonly we are unaware of the growing risk of pre-diabetes through multiple risk factors.  Sure, we all think that we can - and often are - eat healthily and heartily. To that end, remember that our body-mind connection wants us to be in balance. Let's look at one micronutrient - a vitamin - that can be taken to moderate the risk of diabetes. 

What are the risk factors? Rising BMI (weight-to-height ratio), blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose, and long-term blood glucose, measured as A1C.   A recent study done in Australia noted that the development of adult onset, or Type 2 Diabetes, has been shown to be linked to inadequate Vitamin D (25, hydroxycholecalciferol) (Poonam, et al, 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178825). 

What foods and fluids supply Vitamin D? First, it is important to identify good sources of this nutrient. Secondly, let's understand how it functions. Vitamin D is acquired through exposure to sunlight, supplements, and through dietary intake of oily fish (mackerel, sardines, salmon, tuna, caviar, and of course, cod liver oil) and fortified milk, dry breakfast cereals and infant formula.  Key Observation: Vitamin D is in many protein-rich foods.  When diabetes is a chronic disease, it is important to consume protein in all eating occasions: snacks and small meals. Why? Like fats, protein slows the absorption of the ubiquitous carbohydrate/sugars we consume.  Conclusion: practice including protein/Vitamin D sources in your eating occasions makes later working with diabetes easier! 

Interested in how this micronutrient works? Vitamin D must be converted to it's active form in the liver and kidney.  Active forms are referred to as Calcidiol and Calcitriol, as they regulate calcium absorption. These active forms of Vitamin D carefully maintain the levels of calcium and phosphorous in the blood for bone mineralization. It also assists in autoimmune health, neuromuscular functions (preventing tetany) and cell growth.    

How much we need each day ranges from 400 to 800 IUs (International Units) and is referred to as the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) intaken from foods.  Some patients may have their serum Vitamin D (25-(OH)D levels checked and then supplemented by their physician to treat seasonal depression, and other concerns listed above (https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional). One can by over-the-counter Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) for use up to 2000IU per day, if recommended by a physician in tandem with qualifying lab results.

Why take consume food sources or supplement Vitamin D3, which is what we get from sun exposure?  Most of us do not get this vitamin through our skin due to lack of exposure in nature. 

Besides increasing diabetes risk factors, there is "seasonality", or seasonal depression, which can lead to stress, altered sleep patterns, craving foods high in carbohydrates, and unplanned weight gain that is left unmonitored.  Do you experience any of these symptoms without a second thought? Many reasons for them, including genetics, are offered for the pre-diabetes present and growing in both the USA and Australia.  Have you begun to see the benefits of consuming this vitamin? 

Solutions? Adding two servings of fish each week, three servings of fortified milk or formula, are excellent sources of Vitamin D and protein. Protein also increases alertness and helps our minds focus and muscles grow.  What a great food list from which to choose! The other half of your plate would be fruits and vegetables and 1/4th the plate complex carbohydrates (e.g. potatoes, wild rice, whole grain bread, oatmeal). If recommended, you can also supplement as advised by a professional following your health.

Skills can be developed for choosing a balanced diet, choosing vigorous physical activity, stress awareness, and sleep pattern moderation. You can enjoy the change of seasons in any country with focus on the nutrients in your food and fluids! Consider the "D" Vitamin daily.

 

 

 

 

 

Now, why would I need guidance for improved health?

Whether you want to become more aware of what hinders your health goals, evaluate your diet for nutritional balance, or are challenged by constant weight management barriers, adults and their families are what we offer health management for:

Below is a list of suggested reasons to make an appointment with a Stepwise Health, Wellness Dietitian:

 

Not sure what healthy eating habits are

Exercise regime or Menu needs

Situational Stressors are barriers to  my health OR my family's health OR my significant other's health (short term or long term)

Strongly Disliked food groups

​Calorie Restriction​makes food and fluids unpleasant? 

​Strongly disliked health habits you may have been told are "essential" to your success?

​​Rigid structure that mentally grinds over time, but you have to get that done for weight loss?

​Swapping sleep for hours of exercise?

Post-surgery without follow-up nutrition or Dietitian visits (gall bladder removal, major heart surgery, back surgery, limb amputation)

 

 

​We have 21 years of family, long-term care and clinical experience, cooking classes, menu writing, and have published in Weight Matters magazine. 

​Contact: kthisriv@stepwisehealth.com or kthisriv@gmail.com

​Contact: Twitter @ktrivard

​Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, member since 1996

Comments about this five year business

 

 

Honest comments from previous customers:

 

"My sleep gets really screwed up and I need to control my weight." - Rita O.

 

"Since I really needed someone to listen and paraphrase what was going on after surgery, I found these telephone discussions really helpful."  - George V.

 

​"My knee surgery at 55 got me a new diet, vegan soup; what a nice way to recover in style with gourmet colors, recipes and delicious new tastes."  - Judy H.